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Re: Faganís Cavalry Division in 1865

News and Courier, South Carolina, November, 12, 1933.

The Ragged Colonel of the Rawhides
http://www.reynoldsarchives.com/first.arkansas.cavalry.htm

"At the end of the war, rather than surrender to the enemy whom he had fought valiantly for four years, he became an exile, passing over into Mexico. When the hopes of the Confederacy lay dead, and Lee and Johnson had surrendered; when the soldiers of the South laid down their arms, and confessed they could do no more, Monroe assembled his regimental Commanders and told them to do as they wished, but that he could never say to his men, "Go home; we are whipped. "He laid his head on his hands and wept, as his men crowded around him, saying, "Good-bye, Colonel. "His reply was, "Farewell, I cannot go with you."

For the short time he was to live, another country gave him sanctuary, and far from the land of his birth, from the thrilling scenes of the four years of the war, he spent the remainder of his life in old Mexico, making headquarters at San Luis Potosi. In a letter to his father, Major David Monroe, at Marion, he spoke of the wickedness of his surroundings and his disgust at the bullfights. In this, his last letter, he expressed a longing for his old home and a desire to see his family and boyhood friends once more, but this hope was never realized, for he had a price upon his head, and could not conscientiously take the oath of allegiance, to get him pardoned, so he died an exile in a far country. Taking the part of a peacemaker in a street fight in San Luis Potosi, he lost his life, and was buried in the Mexican hills. He was twenty-seven years old at the time, and a comrade who had accompanied him on his exile, cut the stars from his coat, and sent them to his brother, Dr. F. M.. Monroe, who had returned to Marion at the close of the war, and began the practice of medicine. These stars are still treasured by his niece, Miss Elizabeth Monroe, of Latta, along with several letters from the exile, and his nephew M. M.. Monroe, of Latta, has in his possession two daguerreotypes of his uncle---one was made when he was a college student in company with the late Mclver Law---the other in Arkansas in his army clothes with a comrade."

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Faganís Cavalry Division in 1865
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Re: Faganís Cavalry Division in 1865
Re: Faganís Cavalry Division in 1865
Re: Faganís Cavalry Division in 1865
Re: Faganís Cavalry Division in 1865
Re: Faganís Cavalry Division in 1865