The Civil War News & Views Open Discussion Forum

Re: What I found today
In Response To: What I found today ()

Yes, David, I do find that interesting. The McAdory's are one of about 70 surnames I am fairly familiar with in Attala County. Actually, I show four James McAdorys - one born Bef 1789 (thought to be) in York County, SC; d. Bet 1815-1835, Madison County, Alabama. The next was his son, James McAdory, b. abt 1814, Alabama; d. 2 Jul 1866, Attala County. The next one was James A. McAdory (son of James b. 1814) b. 16 Mar 1852, Attala County, d. 25 Jul 1852, and the last was James W. McAdory, b. abt 1838, Alabama, grandson of James McAdory, b. McAdory, b. Bef 1789 (as shown above).

Interesting observation about the Slave Schedules, David. Made even more interesting since your natural curiosity found it and uncovered an actual example to undermine the validity of the Slave Schedule.

I'm copying your original note below since I want to carry it along with my response and check out a few Smith County things you have mentioned,

"While doing research on one subject not related to my family I discovered an interesting fact, that combined the two. I was looking for the census information on a Dr. Mackadore in 1860 Smith County Mississippi mentioned in the book "Grierson's Raid" by Brown. I was trying to locate where the "Mackadore" Plantation was located in Smith County. I could not find a Mackadore in the census but I did find a James McAdory in the 1860 slave schedule for Smith County with about a dozen slaves. This forced me to read the entire Smith County census to find James McAdory; I did not find him, but later found a like James McAdory in the 1860 census Attala County, a very rich man, with a number of slaves and then a bit older James McAdory in Jefferson County, Alabama, also very rich, with a very large population of slaves. So I then started looking for slave owners nexted to James McAdory's Smith county 1860 slave schedule. What I found was nearly 50% of those slave owners did not show up on the Smith County census, but did show up in other counties, owning even more slaves. This is more evidence that the Federal Slave Sensus Schedule is flawed as a means to count the number of slave owners since each county counted the number of names and did not cross reference them for repeated owners in different areas.

I was never able to determine where the plantation was located but I did find out my GG Uncle Stephen Owens of Smith County was the Sheriff of the county and living in Raliegh in 1860. In the book "Grierson's Raid" there is mentioned that when Grierson's force entered Raliegh a man on horseback was seen riding fast out of town. Grierson sent men after him and he was caught. It was discovered he was the Sheriff and was trying to save $3000 of the Counties funds from the Union forces. No mention to what they did with him, but this could have very well been my relative. I read this story many times, and have remembered it well, and never knew there maybe a family connection.

Messages In This Thread

What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Concerning Robert and James McAdory
Attention, David
Re: Attention, David
Re: Attention, David
Re: Attention, David
Re: Concerning Robert and James McAdory
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today
Re: What I found today