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Re: "galvanized" Yankees
In Response To: Re: "galvanized" Yankees ()

There has not been enough done to properly honor these soldiers. I wish that I could place a stone on my gr gr grandfathers grave to recognize his entire military service to his country.

My Gr Gr Grandfather, William L. Hail, alias Daniel J. Moore, a Galvanized Yankee.

William L. Hail, s/o Benjamin Hail and Catherine Reynolds, was born on February 12, 1841 in Culpeper County, Virginia.

There is very little known about William prior to the Civil War. His history on paper begins with his military and pension records. A man of small stature and build, William stood 5’7”, of dark complexion, hazel eyes and dark hair. As reported in 1903 on his pension paperwork, William weighed 145 pounds. He began his military service on May 21, 1861, when he enlisted in the Confederate Army.

On May 25, 1861 he enrolled in active service at Stevensburg, and was mustered into service June 6, 1861, Culpeper Court House into Capt. John Taylor’s Co, (Hazelwood Volunteers), Co C 7th Reg’t VA Infantry. He was on active duty from June 6, 1861 to May 21, 1864.

From information that I received from Timothy Wilson, with the 7th Virginia Infantry Re-Enactors Group, Tim7VaANV@webtv.net, clarifys this even more.

“My records show he actually enlisted in Company E from Culpeper Co. Both the Companies C and E were known as Hazelwood Volunteers.

Moore, Daniel J. b 1840 Carpenter. enlisted 5/25/61 at Stevensburg in Co. E as pvt. Teamster, 1/62. Listed as deserter for part of 1862. POW at Milford Station, 5/21/64 (Pt. Lookout). Joined U S Forces 6/9/64.

As a Teamster most likely he was assigned to the wagon train (supply train). Have you seen the Regimental History of the 7th Virginia Infantry by David F. Riggs. It has a roster of all the known soldiers in the 7th Va. Thats all the info I have on him.”

On May 21, 1864, William was captured by the Union forces at Milford Station, and on May 30, 1864 he arrived at Port Royal, VA. He was released June 9, 1864 from the Roll of Prisoners of War and enlisted June 9, 1864 for 3 years into the United States Volunteers, Company G 1st Regimental Infantry at Point Lookout, Md. He was received from the depot of Recruits June 28, 1864. Continuing to use his alias, Daniel J. Moore, to protect his family in the South, with his enlistment into the Union Army, William became a “Galvanized Yankee”.

The name, Daniel J. Moore, was found on the roster containing the names of those Confederate Soldiers from Point lookout Prison that took the Oath of Alleigence and joined the Union Army as part of the 1st United States Volunteer Infantry.

Confederate Soldiers
Who Served
With the 1st United States Volunteer Infantry
From Point Lookout Prison Maryland
L through P

Name of Soldier Co. Rank In Rank Out

Bernard D., Moore B Private Private
Briant B., Moore E Private Private
Daniel J., Moore G Private Private
Frederick A. T. Moore F Musician Musician
Paul, Moore H Private Private

An excerpt from the research notes of Willie Hail, a distant cousin, tells about Williams experience. Quotes from Willie Hail's research:
"The Civil War tore our family apart, I did learn that Grandfather Hail (William) and his father, altho' they lived in a Confederate State of Va where a Union sympathizer if it was known would almost be suicide. They were bitterly against slavery, but then that war came along; Grandfather (William L.), being draft age, had to go into the Confederate Army; against what he thought was right, so after the war he never went back to his home.
Grandfather Hail spent 5 long years in that Civil War, was wounded seven times. On May 17, 1864 he and his whole regiment was captured at Milford, Va. He was put in the Union Prison at Point Lookout, Maryland and the history on that prison - it was something awful; it was cold, damp - they were housed in tents - in cold weather they slept on the bare ground, no straw or anything to protect them from the cold. Most of the men were from the south where the weather wasn't so cold; they really suffered. The history said that the men would kill rats and cook them to eat. For prison guards they had Negroes; naturally they hated the Rebel soldiers; they'd shoot in amongst the soldiers for no reason at all. Pres. Lincoln needed soldiers badly to go west and help corral the Indians who were killing and plundering the white people in Minnesota and the Dakota's. Grandfather volunteered; they sent him and others to Ft. Ripley, Minn. He saw service in Minn. and the Dakotas 'til the end of the war; was discharged at Leavenworth, Kans. Oct. 22, 1865. In Oct. 12, 1866 he was married in Leavenworth to Martha Elvira Grantham. They settled in Dade Co. Mo.; lived there the rest of their lives. He received a Gov't pension; on his disability from a head wound in the last battle he was in. They used all their ammunition and fought with rocks, clubs, gun butts or anything they could get their hands on.

In Grandfathers later years he lost his hearing and his mind was affected from the old head wound he had received from the war. My dad, (John Wesley), said that when he had a real bad spell his memory would go back to the war. I have his obituary; his father and mother probably died during that Civil War. Culpepper, Va. was in the heart of some of the biggest battles."

Already stated in Willie’s text above, after William finished his service as a “Galvanized Yankee” in the union Army, William married Martha Elvira Grantham. Martha was the daughter of Joseph Grantham and Elvira Elizabeth Clark(e). Martha was born March 10, 1855 in Greenfield, Dade County, Missouri.

After the war, William and Martha went with Martha’s parents back to Dade County, Missouri, where the Grantham’s had farm land, to try to take up a normal life and begin their family. They raised four sons, Joseph Benjamin, William Clark, James Garrison and John Wesley.

Again, although we know very little about William prior to the Civil War, he apparently had a background of carpentry and took that up as a trade in Dade County to support his family. An amusing story passed down through the family that was told by Will Allen, son of Prudence Diane Grantham and James W. Allen, relates this fact:

"William Hail was a cabinet maker; his son William Clark was also a cabinet maker, and also made caskets for neighbors or anyone who asked them to make them.

Grandfather William Hail bought a fine house to tear down for the lumber when William was 14, 15, or 16 years old. His Dad sent Clark and another boy to tear it down; they were supposed to stay during the week and come home on Sundays. The place was so far away they couldn't go and return the same day and get any work done.

The first night after they went to bed, they heard chains rattling; sounded (like) the chains were going upstairs. They tho't it was Satan; scared practically to death they went home the next morning. The dad sent them back and told them not to come back 'til on Sunday.

When they got back they found pack rats had carried chains and other things in the house and the noise they'd heard was the chain being dragged by those rats."

William’s mental problems that Willie spoke of were apparently true. Information documenting stays in mental hospitals in Fulton and Nevada, Missouri were found that confirm this. Dade Co., Missouri Historical Society published a book, “Remembering the Forgotten Ones”. On pg. 81, quoting from the section, “Dade County Poor Book 1”, it mentions, quoting below, County Court Record Vol 7, 8 and 9:

7 Feb 1883, pp 584 #52-- paid to the sheriff for keeping William Hail,

insane in jail $8.50

7 May 1883, p 609 #114-- paid to John W James for care of William Hail
$15.00

Apparently, he was ordered sent to Fulton #1 Hospital for treatment and
care.

8 Nov 1883, p 92 #174-1/2 cost bill from Fulton #1 did not list any

names, but total due was $287.90, nor did subsequent bills list
names

17 Nov 1888, Vol 8, p 311, all county patients were removed from Fulton
#1 to Nevada #3, including William Hail.

The John W. James mentioned in this quote was John Wesley James, William L. Hail’s life long friend from Culpeper County, Virginia, that served with him in both the Confederate Army and the Union Army as “Galvanized Yankees”.

William died at the age of 72 years and 2 months, on April 11, 1913 in North Ernest, Dade County, Missouri. Cause of death was listed as Brightes Disease, an inflammation of the filtering units in the kidneys, which contributed to heart failure.

Martha, living thirteen years longer, died on March 11, 1926 of Influenza. The place of death listed on the death certificate was Dade County, 9 miles N.W. Greenfield.

William and Martha are both buried in the Pleasant Grove Cemetery, Dade County, Missouri

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