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Re: 30th Virginia Battalion Sharpshooters

They both were in the 30th, in separate companies however.

George Martin

William M. Bailiff

Residence was not listed;
Enlisted on 7/24/1862 at Carroll Co., VA as a Private.
On 7/24/1862 he mustered into "E" Co. VA 30th Battn SharpShooters
He died of disease on 5/10/1865
(Died in prison of acute dysentery)
He was listed as:
* Absent, sick 8/31/1863 (place not stated)
* On rolls 12/31/1863 (place not stated)
* Furloughed 4/26/1864 (place not stated)
* Returned 5/8/1864 (place not stated)
* POW 9/19/1864 Winchester, VA
* Confined 9/23/1864 Harper's Ferry, WV (Point Lookout, MD)
Promotions:
* Corpl 9/1/1862
Other Information:
born in 1832 in North Carolina
Buried: Prison graveyard
Gravesite: 1722
(Father: Daniel, Mother: Mary, bother of Thomas A. Bailiff.
Married Margaret.)

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F Marion Slusher

Residence Floyd County VA; a 34 year-old Farmer.
Enlisted on 4/6/1863 at Floyd, VA as a Private.
On 4/15/1863 he was drafted into "D" Co. VA 30th Battn SharpShooters
(date and method of discharge not given)
He was listed as:
* Wounded 5/15/1864 New Market, VA (Severely wounded, left leg)
* Hospitalized 10/12/1864 Chimborazo Hospl, Richmond, VA (Wound)
* Hospitalized 12/9/1864 Chimborazo Hospl, Richmond, VA
* Detailed 1/1/1865 Chimborazo Hospl, Richmond, VA (Convalescent doing guard duty)
* Detailed 1/26/1865 Richmond, VA Gnl Hospl 3 (Ordered to surgeon)
* Returned 2/23/1865 (place not stated) (Declared fit for duty)
He was described at enlistment as:
5' 11", light complexion, grey eyes, light hair
(Alive in 1888, age 59.)
After the War he lived in Confederate Vet. Floyd Camp 111, VA

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Here is an account of POWs in transit and at Point Lookout from Sept. 64'

J. B. Travwick was captured at Fisher’s Gap, near Strasburg. After some delay at Winchester, Harper’s Ferry and Baltimore, I was carried by steamer to Point Lookout , Maryland, arriving there on October 3. On entering prison we were divested of everything except personal wear and blankets. Not long after our arrival an inspection was held, and in every case where prisoners had more that one blanket, unless concealed, they were all taken except one to each man, and then those who did nt have any were supplied with blankets that had been taken from their fellow-prisoners. Barefooted prisoners were supplied with shoes, and a scant quantity of clothing were give to the most destitute.

The tents were mostly bell or round-shaped. They had been refused for use in the Federal army and generally leaked. The rations as to quality were, as a rule, good. Pork two out of three days, the third day beef, but occasionally the ribs of beef were round, which showed that it was mule-beer. Hungrey prisoners ate it all the same. The bread was served in pound loaves daily, one loaf to be divided between two prisoners-it was short weight. A pint cup of soup went with each loaf of bread. Two day’s rations were issued on Saturday, and so small was the quantity that men frequently ate all given at one time.

The ration for a day was about sufficient for a well man one meal. It was said by the prison authorities to be one-half ration a day. The pork was very fat, and always boiled. The prisoners never got the lard that came out of the port, and it was commonly reported that the provost marshal and other officers there relized a vast amount from the sale of this grease to soap-makers and lard-refiners. The water used by the prisoners was mineral, giving the sharpest of appetites with so little to eat. Our sufffering from hunger was indescribable.

I have heard men pray to be made sick that the appetite might be taken away. The prisoners being so poorly clad, and the Point so much exposed to cold, it caused them great suffering. Every intensly cold night from four to seven prisoners would freeze to death. Almost no wood was furnished. About a cord of green pine to one thousand men for five days. It was mockery.

I was paroled and left Point Lookout February 18, 1865. While free from any special sickeness, I was reduced sixty-five pounds in weight, purely for want of sufficient food. (SHSP Vol. 18, 1890, pp. 431-435) , Rev. J. B. Travwick)

Confederates who died at Point Lookout are now buried in a mass grave w/o markers

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30th Virginia Battalion Sharpshooters
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